Breakdown: Fluffy Carpets Made of Layers
Events
Subscribe:  iCal  |  Google Calendar
Las Vegas US   8, Jan — 12, Jan
Zürich CH   31, Jan — 4, Feb
Leamington Spa GB   31, Jan — 3, Feb
Bradford GB   6, Feb — 11, Feb
Bradford GB   7, Feb — 9, Feb
Latest comments

awesome

Many thanks for share 80.lv!

by Ayato
9 hours ago

features ? :))))))) , its long time that 3dsmax , maya and other autodesk tools are dead

Breakdown: Fluffy Carpets Made of Layers
13 November, 2018
News

Brendon Chung has recently shared an excellent breakdown of the way he’s creating fluffy carpets for his project Skin Deep.

First, check out the final results below:

And here’s how it looks in the model editor:

The final model consists of eleven polygons and actually looks like a carpet. The artist started the whole thing with this tech writeup of the fur tech in Shadow of Colossus.

Basically, creating a carpet is about setting up a series of layers: 

Each layer here is a flat plane. The texture is said to be a bunch of dots, representing the carpet fibers. “When you stack layers tightly together, it creates the illusion of a fluffy carpet.”

Animations of the layers getting stacked up:

Make sure to check out the full breakdown here.

Comments

Leave a Reply

6 Comments on "Breakdown: Fluffy Carpets Made of Layers"

avatar
imt.lmzamora@gmail.com
Member
imt.lmzamora@gmail.com

Yeah! this is a old good method from Shadow of the Shadow of the Colossus and that cute furry spiders from Mario Galaxy. this method saves a lot of resources if I remember fine

Charles
Guest
Charles

Unless I’m mistaken, this is how Shadow of the Colossus handles the fur on the Colossi

Jack
Guest
Jack

Yeah, as others have mentioned this isn’t really practical in realtime graphics. Specifically as James mentioned using POM with Pixel Depth Offset is going to look a lot better and be a lot cheaper for perf.

Marcus
Guest
Marcus

Respectfully, we did this back in 2002 for grass and it wasn’t a good idea even back then. It looks “okay”, but the perf costs are outrageous.

James
Guest
James

I’d like to know the pros and cons of this vs Parrallax Occlusion Mapping with Pixel Depth Offset. I can see this being a bit of a headache for the GPU due to overdraw.

Simon
Guest
Simon

Isn’t this a fairly slow way of doing this kind of effect? Not in terms of setup, but in terms of cost on the GPU. As you are stacking layers of transparency on top of each other, so for each pixel of transparency you are overdrawing it X number of times.

wpDiscuz
Related articles
Education
Character Art Program
Education
Character Art Program