Making Order Out of Chaos in Photoshop
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Latest comments
by Admin
1 hours ago

Sorry guys, missed this. We'll credit the artist, sorry!

by Nadav Hekselman
3 hours ago

Looks beautiful. Thank you for the information.

by Vaidas
7 hours ago

Technically, the artist needs to (and does) credit the author of the artwork he referenced and only mention what and where from the character is. Given that, this is a 3d/gaming/technical thingie-ma-jibs website that does not (and probably shouldn't really) reflect on the circumstance of the character itself, but concentrate on creation and techniques used in creation. The name of the character is referenced, but nowhere on the original art the name Sam Riegel is mentioned. As much as critter community is nice and welcoming, this part of "CREDIT THIS OR CREDIT THAT" irritates me. IMHO, Credit is given where credit is due. This 3d model was made with learning purposes only, whereas the original art is being sold. Instead of commenting "GIVE CREDIT" comment "COOL ART OF SAM'S CHARACTER" or "GREAT CRITICAL ROLE ART". All that said, this is an amazing rendition of the original artwork of the character of critical role. As a critter, I love both this piece and the idea of other critter being so talented! Peace, a member of the wonderful critter family.

Making Order Out of Chaos in Photoshop
14 November, 2017
News

David Paget shared a nice video of making something out of chaos in Photoshop. The artist, inspired by a technique from Long Pham, showed how you can use Custom Shapes to create atmospheric concept art. You would probably not use this approach for professional work, but it’s still a nice way of looking at things.

I’ve been playing around with Custom Shapes in Photoshop and while I was digging into it, I stumbled across a video by Long Pham. In his video, he used Custom Shapes in quite an experimental way to lay down a lot of randomly placed shapes, and then tried find patterns within the shapes to create new compositions. I thought it was a great way to try and generate new compositions and I also like the approach of having no previous design ideas at the beginning of the process and just seeing what happens. So, I thought I’d give it shot!

I also applied a rule to myself which was to not use CTRL+Z at all during the process. CTRL+Z is a handy little shortcut, and I sometimes wonder if I’m overly reliant on back stepping my work and second-guessing myself a lot. Removing that tool really forced me to think about what I was doing and commit to my decisions. There were points during the process where I erased things out or deleted layers entirely, but I was trying to not rely on my muscle memory.

David Paget 

And here is the original technique by Long Pham:

Source: YouTube

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