Making Order Out of Chaos in Photoshop
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It's not shown in the video, but there is an option in the Poly Reduce node to keep Quads and it does a marvelous job keeping intact the original shape decreasing geometry in the areas whereis not needed. Unfortunately the Poly Reduce node only keeps quads if the input mesh is already quad based. In order to get quads from non quad geometries you need to try the Voxel node.

can 80.lv stop posting this kind of low-quality 'showcase' articles? If I wanna find showcase/reel, I can find them easily on Viemo, cgsociety. Everyone know houdini can be used to do destruction, simulation, etc. there is no need to show another destruction unless posting a helpful 'tutorial'. However, this is not.

Can it produce quads, too?

Making Order Out of Chaos in Photoshop
14 November, 2017
News

David Paget shared a nice video of making something out of chaos in Photoshop. The artist, inspired by a technique from Long Pham, showed how you can use Custom Shapes to create atmospheric concept art. You would probably not use this approach for professional work, but it’s still a nice way of looking at things.

I’ve been playing around with Custom Shapes in Photoshop and while I was digging into it, I stumbled across a video by Long Pham. In his video, he used Custom Shapes in quite an experimental way to lay down a lot of randomly placed shapes, and then tried find patterns within the shapes to create new compositions. I thought it was a great way to try and generate new compositions and I also like the approach of having no previous design ideas at the beginning of the process and just seeing what happens. So, I thought I’d give it shot!

I also applied a rule to myself which was to not use CTRL+Z at all during the process. CTRL+Z is a handy little shortcut, and I sometimes wonder if I’m overly reliant on back stepping my work and second-guessing myself a lot. Removing that tool really forced me to think about what I was doing and commit to my decisions. There were points during the process where I erased things out or deleted layers entirely, but I was trying to not rely on my muscle memory.

David Paget 

And here is the original technique by Long Pham:

Source: YouTube

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