Pixelator Turns Any Image Into Pixel Art

Pixelator Turns Any Image Into Pixel Art

Great little tool, which can help you convert any image into an old-school sprite.

If you’re on the lookout for a cool new tool, which can help you with a quick game art fix, check out Pixelator.

It’s a pipeline-like tool that processes the image using a set of smart filters. One filter handles the pixelation, another applies colors palette, the next smooth the result and so on. Here’s how it works.

How does it work

All the filters are highly customisable and can be turned on and off, so Pixelator can handle a large verity of source images, from every style and size, and produce vastly different styles of pixel art. You can achieve almost any pixel-art style imaginable with the right configurations.

When you download Pixelator, you get a comfy windows application with a slick UI and configuration sliders. It looks pretty much like this:

In addition to the windows application, you also get an executable you can run from shell with all possible arguments. This allows you to automate processing and respond to changes in source files. 

When you edit an image in the UI application, there’s always a bottom text that shows the exact command needed to reproduce this configuration using the shell command.

Do I need any post-processing?

No. All the examples you see above are without any post processing – what you see is what you get. However, the pixelation process is not 100% accurate and its not unthinkable that you’d want to highlight or fix some pixels, especially around eyes and eyebrows area that usually needs to be pixel-perfect.

And what about pre-processing?

if you want clean outlines, its important to remove the background before processing the picture in Pixelator (the outline filter works best with transparent background). Note however that you don’t have to be super accurate about the background, since its all going to be pixelated anyway ?

The tool is free if you just want to use it for fun. You can download the free version here. But if you’re looking forward to using it in your game production, you’ll need to purchase a license for $30-70. 

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    Forkknife

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