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Unity Corrects Fee Policy After Backlash

There is more information on who and how will be charged.

Image credit: rafapress

On Tuesday, Unity introduced new fees for developers: creators will have to pay some money based on how often players install their games and the revenue they get from it. This caused a huge backlash in the community – everyone had something to say about this rage-inducing change.

Soon after, the company issued a statement, clarifying some of the conditions and even modifying one of the points in its new vision.

Initially, Unity confirmed that each reinstall would require the developer to pay, but then it "regrouped" and told Axios that only the initial installation would take the fee. This is meant to protect creators from haters incessantly reinstalling the game to punish the developers. However, the fee still stays if a user gets the game on an additional device.

Many people were concerned about game demos, and Unity has an answer for this: demos will not be charged unless they are a part of a full game download. You will have to pay for early access games, but charity titles are free to exist.

"As for Game Pass and other subscription services, [Unity executive Marc] Whitten said that developers like Aggro Crab would not be on the hook, as the fees are charged to distributors, which in the Game Pass example would be Microsoft," said Axios.

"Our core point with this is simply to make sure that we have the right value exchange so that we can continue to invest in our fundamental mission to make sure that we can deliver the best tools for people to make great games."

It looks like all the furious comments got to the company: "It's not fun to get a bunch of angry feedback on any particular day. And I think that that is us needing to clarify some of these points," said Whitten and promised that Unity is listening to complaints and will continue to make sure it delivers the best it can.

What do you think about the policy? Are you going to stay with Unity or move on? Find out more here and join our 80 Level Talent platform and our Telegram channel, follow us on InstagramTwitter, and LinkedIn, where we share breakdowns, the latest news, awesome artworks, and more.

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Comments 8

  • TheUnreal Abyss

    Yeah well going forward they can do whatever they want but charging retroactive for established titles is a money grab.

    3

    TheUnreal Abyss

    ·8 months ago·
  • Anonymous user

    Doesn't make sense to switch to Unreal over this, their per sale fees are much larger. The winners if Unity goes down will be smaller engines, and game diversity.

    0

    Anonymous user

    ·8 months ago·
  • Anonymous user

    If you need to get out of the red, there's nothing wrong with updating your business model. Add a predictable, transparent pricing structure. Say you are adding 1 percent to each sale. Whatever number is deemed equivalent to this ridiculous per install fee, implement that increase. It's easier to implement and transparent to your customers. Then don't even attempt to apply the increase retroactively. Only titles initially released after a certain date.

    Would an increase of any kind have been negative press? Yes, but it would have been a blip on the radar and the general public would have forgotten about it by now.

    By the way, someone's inevitably going to create a "Unity Blocker" that blocks phone home requests and will be incredibly popular because nobody likes you anymore. Good luck with the DMCA request on an app that prohibits network traffic.

    0

    Anonymous user

    ·8 months ago·
  • Testure .

    the damage is done, unity is fucked.

    1

    Testure .

    ·8 months ago·
  • Anonymous user

    If Unity is no longer able to make money with their tool, what makes them think developers will either?  Thats like a broke employer asking employees for money.  Generate your own revenue, don't desperately reach into pockets of struggling developers. And Per first install can still be exploited FYI

    1

    Anonymous user

    ·8 months ago·
  • Anonymous user

    If I am going to spend the next 2 years on something and (maybe) get paid for that work, Unity isn't my first and best choice. It feels like they don't give a f- in games and developers at all.

    1

    Anonymous user

    ·8 months ago·
  • Anonymous user

    It’s not greed, its working out how to fund development - we’d see the same thing with Unreal if Fortnite didn’t exist. The issue is the way they’re going about it is really obnoxious.

    -1

    Anonymous user

    ·8 months ago·
  • TheUnreal Abyss

    If the intention was to make developers leave Unity and switch to Unreal, then they have accomplished that. Company greed over everything. I feel bad for small indie developers who just got screwed over.

    3

    TheUnreal Abyss

    ·8 months ago·

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