Epitasis: Puzzle Game Inspired by Tycho
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Latest comments
by Nils Arenz
3 hours ago

@Tristan: I studied computergrafics for 5 years. I'm making 3D art now since about half a year fulltime, but I had some experience before that. Its hard to focus on one thing, it took me half a year to understand most of the vegetation creation pipelines. For speeding up your workflow maybe spend a bit time with the megascans library. Making 3D vegetation starts from going outside for photoscanns to profiling your assets. Start with one thing and master this. @Maxime: The difference between my technique and Z-passing on distant objects is quiet the same. (- the higher vertex count) I would start using this at about 10-15m+. In this inner radius you are using (mostly high) cascaded shadows, the less the shader complexety in this areas, the less the shader instructions. When I started this project, the polycount was a bit to high. Now I found the best balance between a "lowpoly" mesh and the less possible overdraw. The conclusion of this technique is easily using a slightly higher vertex count on the mesh for reducing the quad overdraw and shader complexity. In matters visual quality a "high poly" plant will allways look better than a blade of grass on a plane.

by Anthony Thomas Gaines
6 hours ago

Is this not like gear VR or anything else

by Starkemis
8 hours ago

Thank you!

Epitasis: Puzzle Game Inspired by Tycho
4 January, 2017
News
Kotaku published a very interesting story on a new game Epitasis from Lucas Govatos. It’s a puzzle exploration game, which looks similar to Myst and The Witness. The interesting thing is that the whole project with its crazy landscapes was actually inspired by electronic music (including, but not limited to Tycho & Washed Out).

There will be a lot of secrets hidden in the world around you, plus the player will be able to solve various puzzles. It’s not the easiest game to play from the looks of it. Some really harsh challenges are ahead. Hopefully the vast foreign virtual world and the abundance of very nice visuals will keep you going. The game had a very troubles development history, but Lucas Govatos is positive that Unreal Engine 4 helped him to achieve the necessary result:

Unreal Engine 4 is a godsend! When Unreal Engine 4 came out, blueprints essentially taught me how to really start prototyping designs and mechanics due to its friendly nature.

Lucas actually writes a lot about the development in his blog, which features a lot of cool info, including breakdown of some systems (like the work with the music) and the rendering of portals in UE4.  It’s a fascinating read, if you’re into UE4 game development.

At the moment, the game is in a state where most basic and core systems are completed. The developer is just building a lot of additional content: levels, assets, designs. It’s a hard and time-consuming process. We do expect to see the demo released in 2017, but as for the final release – it’s still a mystery.

 

Source: kotaku.com

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