Comparison of Post-Processing: Unity vs. Unreal
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by Thomas Guillemot
2 hours ago

Well that's a lot of hats !

by Thomas Van Fossen
7 hours ago

So why not finish the project but making it super generic? Strip all star wars terms out. Then when the game is finished, allow for modders to make a conversion mod that will reinsert the star wars material? That way he can finish it and we all can get what we want and no one has to give up on their dreams.

by Kelvin Hubbert
9 hours ago

When are you guys going to make God of War 5?

Comparison of Post-Processing: Unity vs. Unreal
12 June, 2017
News

In this tutorial jaynam is comparing the way post-processing effects can be used in Unreal Engine 4 and Unity 5.6. He mentioned in his previous comparison of these game engines that UE4 offers more flexibility with the concept of Post Process Volumes than Unity does, in this videos he goes more into detail about this topic.

First he shows a scene in Unity 5.6. without any Post Process Effects assigned. In order to use the Post Processing Stack, which he recommends over single image effect scripts, the user has to download an asset from the Unity Assetstore.

After he downloaded and imported it to Unity, he adds a new Post Process Behavior script to the camera, creates a Post Processing Profile and adds it to the Profile property of the script.

Now the effects can be set for the profile. The Post Processing Stack is a great feature in the opinion of the author but it has to be attached to a camera and has therefore a global scope for the scene.

In Unreal Engine Post Processing can be set by so called Post Process Volumes. Jayanam opens a Unreal Engine 4 project in which a Post Process Volume is added to the level. It has the property called “Unbound” set to true, that indicates that all effects that can be set for the Post Process Volume – which is actually a transformable box – will affect the whole level. 

After that he unchecks the property and demonstrates how the Post Processing is applied for the boundaries of the volume only when the camera is inside of these. He also uses the fading-in and -out of the effects by setting the Blending radius property.

More volumes can also be added to the scene. The author points out that this concept is in his opinion more flexible than the one of Unity, although he really likes using the Post Processing Stack of Unity 5.

Source: Jayanam

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