Getting Into The Industry with Ken Levine
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Latest comments
by Vaidas
33 min ago

Technically, the artist needs to (and does) credit the author of the artwork he referenced and only mention what and where from the character is. Given that, this is a 3d/gaming/technical thingie-ma-jibs website that does not (and probably shouldn't really) reflect on the circumstance of the character itself, but concentrate on creation and techniques used in creation. The name of the character is referenced, but nowhere on the original art the name Sam Riegel is mentioned. As much as critter community is nice and welcoming, this part of "CREDIT THIS OR CREDIT THAT" irritates me. IMHO, Credit is given where credit is due. This 3d model was made with learning purposes only, whereas the original art is being sold. Instead of commenting "GIVE CREDIT" comment "COOL ART OF SAM'S CHARACTER" or "GREAT CRITICAL ROLE ART". All that said, this is an amazing rendition of the original artwork of the character of critical role. As a critter, I love both this piece and the idea of other critter being so talented! Peace, a member of the wonderful critter family.

by Amy
4 hours ago

You need to make it clear that this is an interpretation of someone else’s character and credit them (Sam Reigel, from Critical Role).

by Amy
4 hours ago

As great as this is, it’s not actually “your character” so you should really credit Sam Reigel of Critical Role who created this character, and make it clear this is your interpretation of it, because you make it sound like it was all your idea.

Getting Into The Industry with Ken Levine
26 October, 2017
News

How did you get into the the industry? We’ve recently teamed up with Quixel to hold a contest about the secret here, but we still don’t know the perfect recipe. Let’s remember an article by Ken Levine on the challenges of landing a gamedev job. 

So, what are the secrets here? Here are some tips from Ken:

1) Never ask me: Do you have any jobs open? You are telling them, “I don’t care enough about working at your company to go to your web page.” In fact, never ask somebody you are trying to get a job from ANYTHING that a google search would reveal.

2) Presentation counts. Cover letters should be spell checked. It shows you care and you have a work ethic.

3) You generally don’t need to show up at an interview in a suit or fancy dress. Game companies are universally slob-tastic. Just endeavor to be slightly better dressed than the slobs who work there. We hire on talent, not sartorial skills. However, bad hygiene is probably a deal breaker.

4) Be prepared to THINK in the interview. You will be asked questions that seem to come out of left field, questions you could never prepare for. We want to see how you think on your feet. It’s okay to be wrong. It’s not okay to not have a nimble mind.

5) If you’ve never done creative work on your own time, nobody is going to hire you to do creative work for them. Get writing, drawing, coding NOW. I don’t care if you don’t have time. I wrote and put on plays when I had crappy day jobs. If you want to find your way out of that crappy day job, invest in yourself.

6) For God’s sake, don’t call me Kevin.

Ken Levine 

Make sure to check out the full article here and share more stories in the comments below. 

Source: medium.com
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2 Comments on "Getting Into The Industry with Ken Levine"

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pokey
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pokey

How to tank a AAA developer by Ken Levine. How to be impossible to work with by Ken Levine.

Tobi
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Tobi

Short, simple, good! Thank you Kev… Ken 😀

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