Burn the Bikini Armour: Creating Unique Costumes
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Latest comments
by derjyn@gmail.com
3 hours ago

$16 for a *very* non-performant material? If this was intended for use in high-detail scenes, not meant for gameplay, one would generally just use a flipbook animation, or looping HD video texture (both of which are higher quality and available for free all over). I love options, but c'mon, that's pretty steep. $5, maybe. And you can loop in materials, using custom HLSL nodes. Also, there are better ways of doing this, all around. Somewhere on the forums, Ryan Brucks (of Epic fame) himself touched on this. I've personally been working on a cool water material (not "material blueprint", thankyouverymuch) and utility functions, and am close to the quality achieved here, sitting at ~180 instructions with everything "turned on". The kicker? It's pure procedural. No textures are needed. So this is cool, no doubt about that. In my humble opinion though, it's not "good". It doesn't run fast, and it's more complicated than it needs to be.

Lee is right - you can use a gradient effect when you vertex paint in your chosen 3d modelling platform (I've done it in max), meaning the wind effect shifts from nothing to maximum along the length of the leaf/branch/whatever.

by Lee Stojkovic
4 hours ago

I'm fairly certain you can vertex paint the bottoms of the foliage and control the movement using vertex colors along with the wind node. I did this in an earlier project and was able to create a scene with grass that moved less and less as it went down until stationary. I created the grass and painted the vertexes black to red (bottom to top) in Maya.

Burn the Bikini Armour: Creating Unique Costumes
10 May, 2017
News
Costume is one of the most important elements of any character design. Unfortunately, many developers focus on modern sex appeal, turning their characters into some absurd. How does one create a perfect dress? 3D artist Victoria Smith discussed this problem at Play by Play, pointing out some mistakes. The artist collected the worst and best of costume design in games to explain what makes a dress unique. 

Strongly realized characters are the beating heart of many games, but they are often let down by uninspired or insulting costume choices. Characters of the female persuasion are often most affected by this, with costume design focusing on modern sex appeal over world building or believably. Using the wealth of information from the art of film and television costuming, designing outfits for your characters can be broken down into practical steps and understandable terminology. By taking a look at the worst and best of costume design in games – as well as primary sources and the basics of visual design – you can elevate your character designs and create something truly unique. Nobody wants to appear on the Worst Dressed list, so why should your game characters be any different?

Play by Play

Source: Play by Play

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