Interior Mapping: Rendering Real Rooms Without Geometry
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by Nils Arenz
7 hours ago

@Tristan: I studied computergrafics for 5 years. I'm making 3D art now since about half a year fulltime, but I had some experience before that. Its hard to focus on one thing, it took me half a year to understand most of the vegetation creation pipelines. For speeding up your workflow maybe spend a bit time with the megascans library. Making 3D vegetation starts from going outside for photoscanns to profiling your assets. Start with one thing and master this. @Maxime: The difference between my technique and Z-passing on distant objects is quiet the same. (- the higher vertex count) I would start using this at about 10-15m+. In this inner radius you are using (mostly high) cascaded shadows, the less the shader complexety in this areas, the less the shader instructions. When I started this project, the polycount was a bit to high. Now I found the best balance between a "lowpoly" mesh and the less possible overdraw. The conclusion of this technique is easily using a slightly higher vertex count on the mesh for reducing the quad overdraw and shader complexity. In matters visual quality a "high poly" plant will allways look better than a blade of grass on a plane.

by Anthony Thomas Gaines
10 hours ago

Is this not like gear VR or anything else

by Starkemis
12 hours ago

Thank you!

Interior Mapping: Rendering Real Rooms Without Geometry
30 September, 2018
News

Joost van Dongen allowed us to repost his article that explains a little rendering trick to help you generate the geometry for the interiors isn’t actually there similar to windows in Marvel’s Spider-Man. 

The recently released game Marvel’s Spider-Man has interiors behind windows in many buildings. This looks great and it seems to be done using a rendering trick: the geometry for the interiors isn’t actually there and is generated using a shader. I haven’t seen any official statement by Insomniac regarding how they made this, but based on how it looks it seems very likely that they implemented interior mapping: a technique I came up with in 2007 as part of my thesis research. I’ve never written about this on my blog before so I figure this a good moment to explain the fun little shader trick I came up with.

Let’s start by having a look at some footage from Marvel’s Spider-Man. The game looks absolutely amazing and Kotaku has captured some footage of the windows in particular:

As you can see around 0:40 in this video the rooms aren’t actually there in the geometry: there’s a door where there should clearly be a window. You also see a different interior when you look at the same room from a different corner of the building. In some cases there’s even a wall that’s beyond a corner of the building. All of these suggest that the rooms are faked, but nevertheless they are entirely perspectively correct and have real depth. I expect the faults of these rooms don’t matter much because while playing you probably normally don’t actually look at rooms as closely as in that video: they’re just a backdrop, not something to scrutinise. I think creating rooms this way adds a lot of depth and liveliness to the city without eating up too much performance.

Before I continue I’d like to clarify that this post is not a complaint: I’m thrilled to see my technique used in a big game and I’m not claiming that Insomniac is stealing or anything like that. As I stated in the original publication of interior mapping, I’d be honoured if anyone were to actually use it. If Insomniac indeed based their technique on my idea then I think that’s pretty awesome. If they didn’t, then they seem to have come up with something oddly similar, which is fine too and I’d be curious to know what they did exactly.

So, how does interior mapping work? The idea is that the building itself contains no extra geometry whatsoever. The interiors exist only in a shader. This shader performs raycasts with walls, ceilings and floors to figure out what you should be seeing of the interior.

The ray we use is simply the ray from the camera towards the pixel. The pixel that we’re rendering is part of the exterior of the building so we only use the part of the ray beyond the pixel, since that’s the part of the ray that’s actually inside the building.

Doing raycasts may sound complex and expensive, but it’s actually really simple and fast in this particular case. The trick is to add a simple limitation: with interior mapping, ceilings and walls are at regular distances. Knowing this we can easily calculate which room we’re in and where the ceiling and walls of that room are. Ceilings and walls themselves are infinite geometric planes. Calculating the intersection between an infinite plane and a ray is only a few steps and eats little performance.

A room has 6 planes: a ceiling, a floor and 4 walls. However, we only need to consider 3 of those since we know in which direction we’re looking. For example, if we’re looking upward then we don’t need to check the floor below because we’ll be seeing the ceiling above. Similarly, of the 4 walls we only need to consider the 2 that are in the direction in which we’re looking.

To figure out exactly what we’re seeing, we calculate the intersection of the ray with each of those 3 planes. Which intersection is closest to the camera tells us which plane we’re actually seeing at this pixel. We then use the intersection point as a texture coordinate to look up the colour of the pixel. For example, if the ray hits the ceiling at position (x,y,z), then we use (x,y) as the texture coordinate, ignoring z.

A nice optimisation I could do here at the time is that we can do part of the intersection calculations for each of the three planes at the same time. Shaders used to be just as fast when using a float4 as when using a float, so by cleverly packing variables we can perform all 3 ray-plane intersections simultaneously. This saved a little bit of performance and helped achieve a good framerate with interior mapping even back in 2007 when I came up with this technique. I’ve been told that modern videocards are faster with float than float4, so apparently this optimisation doesn’t achieve much anymore on today’s hardware.

For more details on exactly how interior mapping works, have a look at the paper I wrote on interior mapping. This paper was published at the Computer Graphics International Conference in 2008. Having a real peer-reviewed publication is my one (and only) claim to fame as a scientist. This paper also includes some additional experiments for adding more detail, like varying the distance between walls for rooms of uneven size and randomly selecting textures from a texture atlas to reduce repetition in the rooms. It also goes into more detail on the two variations shown in the images below.

Since we’re only doing raycasts with planes, all rooms are simple squares with textures. Any furniture in the room has be in the texture and thus flat. This is visible in Spiderman in close-ups: the desks in the rooms are in fact flat textures on the walls. As you can see in the image below it’s possible to extend our raycasting technique with one or more additional texture layers in the room, although at an additional performance cost.

After having published this blogpost one of the programmers of Simcity (2013) told me that interior mapping was also used in that game. It looks really cool there and they have a nice video showing it off. They improved my original idea by storing all the textures in a single texture and having rooms of varying depth. The part about interior mapping starts at 1:00 in this video:

If you’d like to explore this technique further you can download my demo of interior mapping, including source code. If you happen to be an Unreal Engine 4 user you can also find interior mapping as a standard feature in the engine in the form of the InteriorCubeMap function.

After all these years it’s really cool to finally see my interior mapping technique in action in a big game production! If you happen to know any other games that use something similar, let me know in the comments since I’d love to check those out.

Joost van Dongenweg

For more blog posts on the development of Awesomenauts, Swords & Soldiers, Cello Fortress, Proun, Joost’s music and any of the other stuff Joost works on, check his dev blog at www.joostvandongen.com.
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7 Comments on "Interior Mapping: Rendering Real Rooms Without Geometry"

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Archer Sterling
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Archer Sterling

Anyone have any idea how to achieve the same effect in Unity? Need to render a 3D scene of rolling hills onto the surface of the interior walls of a pipe that the players of my game are travelling through.

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also, you can learn about this technique in UE4 in this interview with Joel Westman https://80.lv/articles/environment-production-from-cryengine-to-ue4/

kevinbaker3d@gmail.com
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kevinbaker3d@gmail.com

A quick note for anyone trying to replicate this: the UE4 shader editor has a node that makes this very easy to set up. I believe it’s named “Interior Cubemap”.

Davide
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Davide

SBEKU no MEKU APPROVES

Chris
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Chris

This sound a lot like the technique Weta used to render interiors of New York buildings for King Kong in 2004-2005. Chris White and others there developed some amazing technology for recreating 1930s New York.

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