Generating Concrete and Cracks in Substance Designer
Events
Subscribe:  iCal  |  Google Calendar
1, Jul — 1, Aug
San Diego US   19, Jul — 23, Jul
Torino IT   25, Jul — 29, Jul
Shanghai CN   3, Aug — 7, Aug
Vancouver CA   12, Aug — 17, Aug
Latest comments

Enjoyed reading the article. I used to be a gaming addict in my teenage and everyone used to scold us for that. Now we are witnessing a great revolution in the field of gaming. Developers of gaming are setting up new benchmarks. I use gaming devices made by https://netgears.support/netgear-powerline/

by Filip van Halter
11 hours ago

Ace bru!

Does OWHQ have some kind of sleeping quarter? Just wondering, I mean, where do they sleep?

Generating Concrete and Cracks in Substance Designer
15 March, 2018
News
Tutorial

Daniel Swing has recently shared a quick tutorial on the way he’s working on concrete and glass surfaces in Substance Designer. The guide doesn’t show the full process, but rather focuses on some key elements. Take some to study the tips and tricks from the artist, build your own substance and share it with us! 

Here is a small piece of the tutorial: 

Concrete

We’ll start from the top and dive in on the details! Here you can see the full graph (which we will cover about 10% of) and the final crack-pattern.

First of all, to get some surface noise going, I applies a ‘Gradient Linear 3’ and crank up the tiling to 256, then warping it slightly with a ‘Perlin Noise’ so that the gradients aren’t compleatly straight. I then run it through a slope blur with ‘Cloud2’, then blended it into my height map using the “overlay” blend mode.

The basic color

Here you can see the very basic way I create the largest crack-flakes in the pattern I warp it with a small ‘Perlin Noise’ and then with a ‘Cloud2’. I use a ‘nondirectional_warp’-node that I got from Daniel Thiger’s Gumroad (I don’t know who else to give credit to) – but a directional warp or even a slope blur could render a similar result.

Major credit to Daniel Thiger, I’ve studied a lot of his graphs, this method is greatly inspired by his work:
I then feed the pattern into a ‘FloodFill’ to create gradients of the same shapes. I use the ‘Dilation’-node to tighten up the gaps between the gradients. I blend in a mix of ‘Cloud2’ and a small ‘Perlin Noise’ (to add some noise and un-even-ness in the gradients) and then pull it through a ‘Histogram Scan’ – I will use this as a mask for where I will put my smaller cracks later on. As you can see, the histogram has the position parameter exposed: That’s because I want to be able to tweak it as I go, masking out a larger or smaller part of the largest flakes.

Daniel Swing 

Make sure to check out the full tutorial here. 

Source: ArtStation
Comments

Leave a Reply

2 Comments on "Generating Concrete and Cracks in Substance Designer"

avatar
Bas
Guest
Bas

Evan Liaw and Bradford Smith – ( ‘nondirectional_warp’-node that I got from Daniel Thiger’s Gumroad (I don’t know who else to give credit to)

Ivain
Guest
Ivain

Funny thing, I was trying to create a material almost exactly like this as an exercise in designing my own materials. I guess I’ll see if I can build on this.

wpDiscuz